Divers, Wrecks, and Marine Life off Hatteras Island

Clear Blue Water on the Proteus, July 2007 - Courtesy Tom Born

Sandtiger on Proteus - Courtesy of Tom Born

Barracuda - Courtesy of Russell Blackwood

Sandtiger on Proteus - Courtesy of Tom Born

Sandtiger 3

Sandtiger and Divers on Proteus - Courtesy of Tom Born

Want a shark dive?
No problem-- In Hatteras these graceful creatures (Sand Tigers) are a common site on the wrecks any time of year.

"Wolfie"

Freediving at age eight!

Courtesy of Russell Blackwood

 


"Hanging in blue 82 degree water"


 


"Proteus Prop" courtesy of Simon Brown/2004


"Diver on Scooter" courtesy of Simon Brown/ 2004


"Hawksbill Turtle on Dixie Arrow" courtesy of Simon Brown/ 2004

Mahi-Mahi - Courtesy of Russell Blackwood


"Atlantic Spadefish on Dixie Arrow" courtesy of Simon Brown/ 2004


"Oyster Toad" courtesy of Simon Brown/ 2004


 


"Getting Closer": courtesy of Heidi Sheltry


"Sand Tiger" courtesy of Kim Russell/ 2001

 


"Sand Tiger Shark on 'Mr. JC'" courtesy of Jarrod Cederquist/ Sept 2002

 


"Looking Up-Dixie Arrow" courtesy of Tara Williamson / August 2002.

 


 


Southern Sting Ray

Various species of rays live and migrate off of the Hatteras coast.

 


Lionfish.

Although not indigenous to the Atlantic, dozens of different lionfish have been sighted off the coast of Hatteras since 2000..

 


Want a shark dive?

No problem-- In Hatteras these graceful creatures (Sand Tigers) are a common site on the wrecks any time of year.

 


 

Rodale's Scuba Diving Magazine readers rated Outer Banks Diving as offering:

*The Most BIG Animals
*The Best Value For Your Diving Dollar 
*The Best Diving Destination by Region (Eastern US)
*The Second Best Fish Life

 

 

 


Shipwrecks are often the initial draw to Hatteras, but divers soon learn that the same wrecks provide the basis for artificial reef formation. The warm, blue water off Diamond Shoals means tropical fish. Since most of our wrecks have been here 50 years or more, many have fully developed ocean microcosms, populated by all kinds of critters, making it an colorful location to brush up on underwater photography. Divers off of Hatteras, regularly spot a broad array of sea life, including tropical fish (eg., tangs, wrasses, angelfish) skates and rays (southern's, rough tails, and the occasional manta), endangered sea turtles and sharks.


The diving season in Hattaras extends from April through Thanksgiving. During the summer months, the warm gulfstream waters push the cold Labrador currents further north, resulting in tropical diving conditions off Hatteras. Bottom temperatures usually range in the high 70's and low 80's (compared with 60+ degree temps off of Nags Head, just 80 miles north) in  August and September. 



  SNORKELING TRIPS can provide non-divers the same sea life viewing         opportunities! Gear and cameras available for rent.


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